Browsing the archives for the General Posts category.


  • Summer - Fall 2015 Intensive

    Join us for our

    2015 Summer/Fall Intensive!

    Take the whole intensive or pick and choose classes: it's up to you.

    We'll take wild edibles walks, forage, use wild food in our lunch (provided for you!), have discussions, hands-on activities, mushroom foraging, wild food demos and tastings and much more!

    Learn more about the intensive and register here.

  • Time To Choose Your Wild Plant Ally!

    Wild Plant Ally Workbook Cover
  • Winter Foraging Wild Food Feasting

    Winter Foraging Wild Food Feasting"
  • Our New Ebook is Here!

    Wild Edibles 101"
  • Recent Posts

  • More Great Posts!

  • THE WILD EDIBLE SERIES
    Food Under Foot Logo Get Started on Your
    5-Part Wild Edible Series
    FREE when you
    Enter Your Email.
    FREE NEWSLETTER
    Get Free Newsletter, Previews
    of our Upcoming eBook, and
    Tips You Won't Find Elsewhere.
    First Name:
    Primary Email:
    Food Under Foot Logo We hate SPAM.
    We will never send it
    or share/sell your email.

Our Wild Food Intensive Starts This Saturday, July 25, 2015

General Posts
-->

Our wild food intensive starts this Saturday, July 25!

Join acupuncturist, herbalist, wild foods educator and founder of Food Under Foot Melissa Sokulski in exploring wild plants as food and medicine. We’ll learn to identify local plants, forage them and use them as food, explore Western botanical medicine as well as touching on Eastern traditions of Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda, and talk about the energetics of the plants we have growing at our feet.

The intensive will run one Saturday in July, then one Saturday and Sunday in August, September and October from 10 am to 4 pm.  Each day will include some or all of these activities:

  • Wild Edibles Walk: identification and discussion of local wild plants
  • Foraging
  • Enjoying a light vegetarian lunch prepared with foods we foraged
  • Discussion of many aspects of wild plants as food and medicine
  • Choosing and working with a Wild Plant Ally
  • Lecture on Western and Eastern Herbal Medicine, incorporating local wild plants/herbs
  • Hands-On Activities like making vinegars, drying herbs, making tinctures
  • Wild Food Demos and Tastings

You won’t want to miss this amazing opportunity!

*Dates and topics are subject to change.

Saturday July 25, 2015:

  • 10:00: Welcome and Introduction
  • 10:30 - 12: Wild Walk, plant ID, discussion and forage
  • 12 - 1: Prepare and Eat Light Vegetarian Lunch of Soup and Salad using foraged food (you are welcome to bring additional food for yourself)
  • 1 - 4: Discussion of:
    • benefits of wild food
    • sustainable foraging
    • Wild Food Demo and Tasting: Green Smoothie
    • definition of herbal properties such as adaptogenic, diuretic, anti-inflammatory, etc with examples of what we saw today
    • Choose Wild Ally

Saturday August 22, 2015:

  • 10:00: Welcome
  • 10:30 - 12: Wild Walk and forage
  • 12 - 1: Light vegetarian lunch of soup and salad with foraged plants
  • 1-2: Make wild edible vinegar with plants foraged that morning
  • 2-4: Discussion of Tonifying and Strengthening Plants as food and medicine: local wild plants as tonics

Sunday August 23, 2015:

  • 10: Welcome
  • 10:30-12: Wild Walk and Forage
  • 12 - 1: Light vegetarian lunch of soup and salad with foraged plants
  • 1-4: Field Trip: Mushroom Foraging

Saturday September 26, 2015:

  • 10:00: Welcome
  • 10:30 - 12: Wild Walk and Forage
  • 12-1: Light vegetarian lunch of soup and salad with foraged plants
  • 1-4: Forage and dry plants for use later as tea and medicine

Sunday September 27, 2015:

  • 10: Welcome
  • 10:30-12: Wild Walk and Forage
  • 12 - 1: Light vegetarian lunch of soup and salad with foraged plants
  • 1-4: Discussion of Traditional Chinese Medicine and the Energetics of Wild Local Plants

Saturday October 24, 2015:

  • 10: Welcome
  • 10:30-12: Wild Walk and Forage
  • 12 - 1: Light vegetarian lunch of soup and salad with foraged plants
  • 1-2: Make medicinal tincture with local wild plants
  • 2-4: Discussion of Ayurvedic Doshas and Energetics of Wild Local plants

Sunday October 25, 2015:

  • 10: Welcome
  • 10:30-12: Wild Walk and Forage
  • 12 - 1: Light vegetarian lunch of soup and salad with foraged plants
  • 1-4:
    • Discuss/Share info about our allies
    • Wild Food Demo and Tasting: scones and tea with wild edibles
    • Holiday Meal Planning with Wild Foods
    • Discussion of Winter Foraging
    • Wrap Up

**If you have to miss a day or a portion of a day, we can schedule a time to meet  (in person, phone, Skype or Facetime) to go over anything you missed.**

Full Intensive: $600

If there is room, you can pick and choose days to attend, each a la carte day costing $125, or $250 per weekend.

Download Registration Form here:

2015 Fall Intensive Registration Form

**If you are coming from out of town, we are on the South Side of Pittsburgh, zip 15203. There are many great hotels, please let me know if you need the information.**

Summer/Fall is such a fun time to forage wild plants for food and medicine! We’ll likely find:

  • Hawthorn berries
  • Kousa dogwood fruit
  • Paw Paws
  • Cornelian cherries
  • Elderberries
  • Crabapples
  • Dandelion roots
  • Burdock Roots
  • Sunchoke Tubers
  • Wild Grapes
  • Chicken Mushroom
  • Hen of the Woods Mushroom
  • Giant Puffball Mushroom
  • Lambsquarters
  • Wild Amaranth
  • Black Walnuts
  • Acorns
  • Plantain
  • Motherwort
  • Mugwort
  • Red Clover
  • Wood Sorrel
  • Self-heal
  • Staghorn Sumac
  • Spicebush berries
  • Garlic Mustard
  • Nettles
  • Chickweed
  • Much more!

Hope to see you there!

~ Melissa Sokulski

Comments

Berries Berries Berries!

General Posts, Identification
-->

It’s berry season in the Northern hemisphere (at least in my little section of the northern hemisphere: the Mid-Atlantic). Here are three deliciously edible berries you can find out and about in the Pittsburgh area right now:

Mulberries! (Morus species.) But get out there soon, while these delicious sweet berries literally grow on trees, their season is just about over here.

mulberries

mulberries

Black Raspberries (Rubus occidentalis). These native berries are just cresting in abundance right now, but also may be a little on the “almost over” side of their season, so get out there!

native black raspberries

native black raspberries

Wine raspberries/Japanese wineberries (Rubus phoenicolasius) are just getting ripe! You can identify these red berries by the amount of thorns on their twigs: so much the twigs look like they are covered with red fur! These berries grow on bushes like black raspberries, are deep red when ripe and so very delicious!

Wineberries

Wineberries

Wild blueberries (Vaccinium species) are also beginning to ripen now…berry season is truly upon us!

wild blueberries from Pennsylvania bog

wild blueberries from Pennsylvania bog

Happy foraging!

Melissa Sokulski

Food Under Foot

Comments

Announcing Summer - Fall Intensive and Apprenticeship/Mentoring Opportunities!

General Posts
-->

Summer - Fall Intensive:

Wild Plants as Food and Medicine: A Bit of Everything!

Paw Paw Fruits
Paw Paws

Join acupuncturist, herbalist, wild foods educator and founder of Food Under Foot Melissa Sokulski in exploring wild plants as food and medicine. We’ll learn to identify local plants, forage them and use them as food, explore Western botanical medicine as well as touching on Eastern traditions of Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda, and talk about the energetics of the plants we have growing at our feet.

The intensive will run one Saturday in July, then one Saturday and Sunday in August, September and October from 10 am to 4 pm.  Each day will include some or all of these activities:

  • Wild Edibles Walk: identification and discussion of local wild plants
  • Foraging
  • Enjoying a light vegetarian lunch prepared with foods we foraged
  • Discussion of many aspects of wild plants as food and medicine
  • Choosing and working with a Wild Plant Ally
  • Lecture on Western and Eastern Herbal Medicine, incorporating local wild plants/herbs
  • Hands-On Activities like making vinegars, drying herbs, making tinctures
  • Wild Food Demos and Tastings

You won’t want to miss this amazing opportunity!

*Dates and topics are subject to change.

Saturday July 25, 2015:

  • 10:00: Welcome and Introduction
  • 10:30 - 12: Wild Walk, plant ID, discussion and forage
  • 12 - 1: Prepare and Eat Light Vegetarian Lunch of Soup and Salad using foraged food (you are welcome to bring additional food for yourself)
  • 1 - 4: Discussion of:
    • benefits of wild food
    • sustainable foraging
    • Wild Food Demo and Tasting: Green Smoothie
    • definition of herbal properties such as adaptogenic, diuretic, anti-inflammatory, etc with examples of what we saw today
    • Choose Wild Ally

Saturday August 22, 2015:

  • 10:00: Welcome
  • 10:30 - 12: Wild Walk and forage
  • 12 - 1: Light vegetarian lunch of soup and salad with foraged plants
  • 1-2: Make wild edible vinegar with plants foraged that morning
  • 2-4: Discussion of Tonifying and Strengthening Plants as food and medicine: local wild plants as tonics

Sunday August 23, 2015:

  • 10: Welcome
  • 10:30-12: Wild Walk and Forage
  • 12 - 1: Light vegetarian lunch of soup and salad with foraged plants
  • 1-4: Field Trip: Mushroom Foraging

Saturday September 26, 2015:

  • 10:00: Welcome
  • 10:30 - 12: Wild Walk and Forage
  • 12-1: Light vegetarian lunch of soup and salad with foraged plants
  • 1-4: Forage and dry plants for use later as tea and medicine

Sunday September 27, 2015:

  • 10: Welcome
  • 10:30-12: Wild Walk and Forage
  • 12 - 1: Light vegetarian lunch of soup and salad with foraged plants
  • 1-4: Discussion of Traditional Chinese Medicine and the Energetics of Wild Local Plants

Saturday October 24, 2015:

  • 10: Welcome
  • 10:30-12: Wild Walk and Forage
  • 12 - 1: Light vegetarian lunch of soup and salad with foraged plants
  • 1-2: Make medicinal tincture with local wild plants
  • 2-4: Discussion of Ayurvedic Doshas and Energetics of Wild Local plants

Sunday October 25, 2015:

  • 10: Welcome
  • 10:30-12: Wild Walk and Forage
  • 12 - 1: Light vegetarian lunch of soup and salad with foraged plants
  • 1-4:
    • Discuss/Share info about our allies
    • Wild Food Demo and Tasting: scones and tea with wild edibles
    • Holiday Meal Planning with Wild Foods
    • Discussion of Winter Foraging
    • Wrap Up

**If you have to miss a day or a portion of a day, we can schedule a time to meet  (in person, phone, Skype or Facetime) to go over anything you missed.**

Full Intensive: $600

If there is room, you can pick and choose days to attend, each a la carte day costing $125, or $250 per weekend.

Download Registration Form here:

2015 Fall Intensive Registration Form

**If you are coming from out of town, we are on the South Side of Pittsburgh, zip 15203. There are many great hotels, please let me know if you need the information.**

Summer/Fall is such a fun time to forage wild plants for food and medicine! We’ll likely find:

  • Hawthorn berries
  • Kousa dogwood fruit
  • Paw Paws
  • Cornelian cherries
  • Elderberries
  • Crabapples
  • Dandelion roots
  • Burdock Roots
  • Sunchoke Tubers
  • Wild Grapes
  • Chicken Mushroom
  • Hen of the Woods Mushroom
  • Giant Puffball Mushroom
  • Lambsquarters
  • Wild Amaranth
  • Black Walnuts
  • Acorns
  • Plantain
  • Motherwort
  • Mugwort
  • Red Clover
  • Wood Sorrel
  • Self-heal
  • Staghorn Sumac
  • Spicebush berries
  • Garlic Mustard
  • Nettles
  • Chickweed
  • Much more!

Fill out the registration form and send in your deposit to secure your spot today!

Wild Food and Herbal Apprenticeship and Mentoring

If you are looking for more specific instruction, you may want to consider doing a wild food and/or herbal apprenticeship/mentorship. Apprentices are taken on for a month of study at a time,  and the program of study is created entirely by the apprentice! You will receive guided wild edibles/identification walks, and you will learn what you choose. If you want to focus on learning to cook with whole vegetarian foods and incorporate wild foods into your diet, that is what we’ll do.  If you’d like a deeper understanding of herbal medicine, we will focus on that. If you are interested in energetics of local wild plants in terms of traditional Chinese Medicine or Ayurveda, we will focus on that. If you want to hone your diagnosing and prescribing skills, we can work on that. If you want to learn how to make teas, tinctures, vinegars, oils or salves we’ll do that. A combination or all of the above? You tell me! We will schedule time to meet throughout the month to walk, forage, create and study. You will have access to me through email and text for those times we are not together. You will be welcome to attend all walks and workshops that occur during your apprenticeship month(s) for free, and for half price for the next year.

Apprenticeship is $800/month and up to half can be worked off by work study. Work study options include website work, formatting, editing, publishing, video and podcast editing,  house and office cleaning, pet sitting among other things, we will discuss terms when you take on the apprenticeship.

Download Apprentice Registration/Application Here:

Apprenticeship Application/Registration

We hope you are enjoying your summer, and are excited to see you soon!

Sincerely,

Melissa at Food Under Foot

Comments

Successful May Morel Forage!

General Posts, Identification
-->

Thanks so much to everyone who joined us for our May Morel Forage today! And my sincerest heartfelt apologies to those who tried to come out and got stuck in marathon traffic. (And congratulations to all the runners out there who ran the Pittsburgh marathon and half marathon!!)

Happy Morel Hunters with Morels

Happy Morel Hunters with Morels

We had an awesome day, everyone found morels (Morchella semilibera). We also found some very young tender Dryad’s Saddle (Polyporus squamosus) which should also be very tasty!

Half-free Morel, Morchella semilibera

Half-free Morel, Morchella semilibera

The inside of the half-free, just like that of other true morels (black, gray and yellow) will be hollow:

You can see how this half-free morel stem is completely hollow. Also, the top of the morel is attached almost at its bottom, not at the tip top.

You can see how this half-free morel stem is completely hollow. Also, the top of the morel is attached partway down, leaving a "skirt" and giving it its common name: "half-free."

The stalk of this morel is much more tender and delicate than that of the other morels (which can be tough and rubbery), and is great chopped up and sauteed along with the cap, making for quite a meaty meal.

We identified lots of other wild edibles on our way to the morels, including our first sighting of Lambsquarters (Chenopodium album) of the year.

Lambsquarters, Chenopodium album

Lambsquarters, Chenopodium album

In addition to the Lambsquarters, Morels and Dryad’s Saddle, other edibles we saw and discussed included:

  • Garlic Mustard, Alliaria petiolata
  • Onion Grass
  • Burdock, Arctium
  • Broad-Leaf Dock, Rumex obtusifolius
  • Plantain, Plantago major
  • Deadnettles, Lamium purpureum
  • Chickweed, Stellari media
  • Purple Violet, Viola
  • Yellow Wood Violet, Viola biflora
  • Mayapples, Podophyllum peltatum
  • Dandelion, Taraxacum officinalis

Thanks so much to everyone who came! Get out there and look for morels…they are just coming up in Western Pa! The yellow morels follow the half-free, so we should have at least 3 more weeks of happy hunting!

yellow morel mushroom

yellow morel mushroom

More local information about mushrooms can be found with the Western PA Mushroom Club. You can attend a monthly meeting or go on one of their weekly hikes…if you are interested in learning more about mushrooms this is a great place!

And make sure to do a thorough “tick check” when you come out of the woods…there seem to be an abundance of ticks this year!

Happy hunting, stay safe,

~ Melissa Sokulski

Comments

Screen-Free Week: 11 Ways To Get Out and Enjoy Nature!

General Posts
-->

It’s almost  Screen-Free Week and here in Western PA it couldn’t have come at a better time! It’s FINALLY getting warm, morels are just popping up, cheery dandelions are everywhere, and bird migration is getting into full swing - tons of songbirds are making their way back to and through the area! Here are Food Under Foot’s outdoorsy, nature-oriented suggestions for keeping you so busy you won’t even miss your tv/computer/social media!

screenfree2015

Here are sojme ideas for ways to spend your screen free week from Food Under Foot. It’s what we’ll be doing this week!

1. Go Camping

We absolutely LOVE camping here at Food Under Foot - especially during morel (and dryad’s saddle) season! Last year we stayed in a yurt at Keystone State Park, where in addition to roasting morels over the fire we watched an osprey catch a fish in the lake, watched a hawk catch its dinner on land (both birds of prey flew their catches up into a tree just feet from the yurt to eat!), saw lots of colorful migrating songbirds flitting around in the woods, watched the gazillions of frogs and even took a dip in the lake!

Dryad's Saddle, An Edible Polypore Mushroom

Dryad's Saddle, An Edible Polypore Mushroom

2. Forage for Mushrooms/Hike with a local mushroom group

It’s morel season! If you are not sure how to identify this mushroom, look into going on a hike with your local mushroom group. If you live in Western PA, you are lucky enough to have the Western Pennsylvania Mushroom Group nearby, if you don’t, check the North American Mycological Association for a group near you.

morel mushroom

morel mushroom

3. Have an Afternoon Tea, with Dandelion Tea Cake

Dandelions are easy to come by this time of year! Pick lots of the flowers from an unsprayed area away from the roadside, and follow this recipe for delicious Dandelion Tea Cake.

Dandelion Tea Cake

Dandelion Tea Cake

4. Go for a Bike Ride

Bike trails are great ways to see the country side! Here in Pittsburgh we are lucky enough to have the Great Allegheny Passage Rails for Trails, which goes along rivers and cuts through woods and countrysides, weaving through bike towns.  Bring your camera to photograph all the lovely native wildflowers, such as trillium, which are in bloom right now.

Native Wildflower - White Trillium

Native Wildflower - White Trillium

5. Go Birding

Bird migration is in full swing! Check out your local Audubon, they are likely having weekly bird walks these days! Or just grab some binoculars and a bird guide book and head out to the river or the woods (or the feeder in your yard!) If you don’t have a bird feeder in your yard, you can make one out of pinecones, peanut butter and seeds, or use an old milk container.

Robin Making A Nest

Robin Making A Nest

6. Nature Journaling

Foraging is fun, but sometimes I like to head out with a sketchbook and pencils or watercolors and capture my experience on paper. This is a great way to hone your observation and identification skills, and get to know plants, mushrooms and animals a lot better. You don’t have to be an artist, just brave and adventurous!

Watercolor of Morels

Watercolor Morels

7. Write…about Nature

Write a handwritten letter to someone, write a story, write a journal entry and if you need a prompt: write about the nature you have been observing this week, and your experience of being screen-free.

comic

8. Read a book with great nature writing.

goneaway

Some of my favorite include:

Elizabeth Enright: Gone Away Lake, Return to Gone Away Lake, The Four Story Mistake, And Then There Were Five….well, just anything by Elizabeth Enright!

The Penderwicks in Spring, Jeanne Birdsall

Walden Pond, Thoreau

Desert Solitaire, Edward Abbey

Dandelion Wine, Ray Bradbury

Red Tails in Love, Marie Winn

9. Cartoon Chronicle Your Experience of Screen Free Week

hiatus

10. Go Foraging, of course!

Here are some things that are up right now where we are:

dandelion flowers

dandelion flowers

  • dandelions (Taraxacum officinale)
  • morel mushrooms, Morchella
  • dryad’s saddle mushrooms, Polyporus squamosus
  • garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata)
  • onion grass/wild chives
  • deadnettles, Lamium purpureum
  • stinging nettles, Urtica dioica
  • ground ivy, (Glechoma hederacea)
  • Japanese knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum, or Fallopia japonica)
  • fiddleheads (please harvest sustainably!!)
  • ramps (sustainably, please!)
  • wild ginger (sustainably!)
  • burdock, Arctium
  • mullein (medicinal)
  • motherwort (medicinal)
  • catnip (medicinal) (Nepita cataria)
  • broad-leaf dock
  • yellow dock, (Rumex crispus)
  • violet, (Viola)
  • wild asparagus
  • winter cress (yellow rocket), Barbarea
  • chickweed (Stellaria media)
  • plantain (Plantago major and P. lanceolatata)
  • cleavers (Galium aparine)
  • Redbud Flowers (Cercis canadensis)

Redbud Flowers

Redbud Flowers

11.  Make Dandelion Wine

dandelionwine

Why not? There are plenty of dandelions out there. You can use our Dandelion Wine recipe. And while you’re at it, read Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury. If you’re not into wine, you can try your hand at Dandelion Fritters, served with maple syrup.

These suggestions should keep you busy and happy and not even missing the tv or computer screen!

Have fun, and if you have other suggestions please post them below.

See you on the flip side!

~ Melissa Sokulski

Food Under Foot

Comments

A Walk Through Frick Park

General Posts
-->

img_1523

Getting ready for our walk this Sunday at Frick Park Earth Day, I decided to check out the area where the walk is scheduled.

This year Earth Day is in a NEW location, Lower Frick Parking Lot.

Sign in near the parking lot a half hour before the walk, and you will be directed to our walks which begin at Falls Ravine Trail at 1 pm and 3 pm.

img_1520

I saw lots of amazing plants and animals today walking around there…we are sure to have an amazing walk on Sunday. Hope to see you there!

Deadnettles, Lamium purpurea

Deadnettles, Lamium purpurea

Creeping Charlie/Ground Ivy, Glechoma hederacea

Creeping Charlie/Ground Ivy, Glechoma hederacea

Mayapple, Podophyllum

Mayapple, Podophyllum

Plantain, Plantago major - just coming up

Plantain, Plantago major - just coming up

Cleavers, Galium aparine

Cleavers, Galium aparine

Coltsfoot, Tussilago farfara

Coltsfoot, Tussilago farfara

Spring Beauty, Claytonia virginica

Spring Beauty, Claytonia virginica

Violet, Viola

Violet Leaves, Viola

Violet Flower, Viola

Violet Flower, Viola

Garlic Mustard, Alliaria petiolata

Garlic Mustard, Alliaria petiolata

Cutleaf Toothwort

Cutleaf Toothwort

Dutchman's Britches

Dutchman's Britches

Trout Lily

Trout Lily

Broad Leaf Dock

Broad Leaf Dock

Japanese Knotweed

Japanese Knotweed

Burdock

Burdock

Mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris

Mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris

And many many more (edible) plants! It is going to be a great walk - plenty to discuss!!

And as if plant life isn’t abundant enough, check out  some of the animals we saw today:

Big Black Rat Snake

Big Black Rat Snake

Red Winged Blackbird

Red Winged Blackbird

Robins: the male's head is darker than his back, the female's head and back are the same.

Robins: the male's head is darker than his back, the female's head and back are the same.

There are all kinds of walks to choose from, on the hour from 12 to 4 (last walk at 3.) Our wild edibles walks are at 1 and 3.  Get there early to sign up! The full list of walks is here.  Our walks at 1 and 3  are called Wild Edibles Walk, there’s another wild walk at 12 and 2 called Foraged Flavors, which I’m sure will be lovely as well.

If you can’t make it this Sunday we will be going again in two weeks - on a two hour excursion through the park identifying wild edibles and looking for morels! Find out more about that walk here.

See you soon!

~ Melissa Sokulski

Food Under Foot

Comments

More April Edibles

General Posts, Identification
-->

Today I walked around Frick Park (getting ready for next weekend’s walks for Frick Park Earth Day!) I also snapped a few more pictures of plants in the neighborhood; lots of great stuff coming up!

Last year's crab apples with this year's new leaves

Last year's crabapples (Malus) with this year's new leaves

Chickweed, Stellaria media

Chickweed, Stellaria media

Mullein, Verbascum

Mullein, Verbascum

Cleavers, Galium aparine

Cleavers, Galium aparine

Deadnettles, Lamium purpureum

Deadnettles, Lamium purpureum

Japanese knotweed, Fallopia japonica also Polygonum cuspidatum

Japanese knotweed, Fallopia japonica also Polygonum cuspidatum

Motherwort, Leonurus cardiaca

Motherwort, Leonurus cardiaca

So much coming up!

Now is a great time to start with a wild plant ally.  If you haven’t gotten your wild ally workbook yet, NOW is the time! It is still pay-what-you-choose, and it is a great time to start the process of observing and learning.

As new plant life emerges every day, I encourage you to choose an abundant local weed - like dandelion, nettles, plantain, violet, or burdock - and study it throughout the year.

The workbook guides you through exercises, gives you suggestions and space to explore your plant ally, and in the process learn deeply about wild edibles, healing, and the natural world.

Once you have your workbook, you can use it year after year, exploring new edible plants as you like. A great tool for homeschoolers, nature explorers and learners of all ages! This is how I began learning about wild edibles (dandelion was my first wild ally).

I would love to hear what you choose as a wild ally! Comment below or send me an email.

Visit our previous posts to see what else is around:

Festive Foraging!

~ Melissa Sokulski of Food Under Foot



style="display:inline-block;width:300px;height:250px"
data-ad-client="ca-pub-8448742941249487"
data-ad-slot="9062391065">

Comments

April Walk Through Schenley Park

General Posts, Identification
-->

I took a little walk through the woods of Schenley Park today. Here’s what I saw:

Bunch of Garlic Mustard

Bunch of Garlic Mustard

Garlic Mustard Getting Ready to Bolt and Flower

Garlic Mustard Getting Ready to Bolt and Flower

Burdock

Burdock

Burdock with Ground Eroded Away, Exposing Taproot

Burdock with Ground Eroded Away, Exposing Taproot

Burdock with Taproot

Baby Burdock with Taproot

Dandelion Leaves

Dandelion Leaves

Flowering Dandelion

Flowering Dandelion

Japanese Knotweed Shoots

Japanese Knotweed Shoots

Row of Japanese Knotweed Shoots

Row of Japanese Knotweed Shoots

Motherwort (medicinal)

Motherwort (medicinal)

Forsythia (medicinal)

Forsythia (medicinal)

Broad Leaf Dock

Broad Leaf Dock

Tomorrow I’m going to Frick…I will bring my camera and let you know what I find!

Be sure to join us on our upcoming walks, scheduled for April 19 and May 3 (Morel Hunt + wild walk!)

For more pictures of April wild edibles, including nettles and chickweed, see my April Showers blog post.

Festive Foraging!

~ Melissa Sokulski

Comments
« Older Posts