Browsing the archives for the staghorn sumac tag.


The Wild Pantry: Sumac Seasoning

Raw, Recipes
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Tangy staghorn sumac seasoning is perfect for this Middle Eastern salad

Tangy staghorn sumac seasoning is perfect for this Middle Eastern salad

It’s fun dipping into the wild pantry to add zest and flavor to dishes. For this middle Eastern tabouli recipe, I dipped into the pantry not once, but twice. In addition to this tangy sumac seasoning, I stripped some dried mint leaves off a bundle I have hanging in my kitchen and crumbled those in. (Though it will be up soon, mint has not yet appeared in my neck of the woods - Western PA.)

The fun thing about sumac is that even if you missed harvesting it last fall, it’s available all winter. As long as you can find those red bundles on the otherwise bare trees, you can harvest and use sumac, which tastes fresh and lemony and is high in vitamin C.

Sifting Dried Staghorn Sumac

Sifting Dried Staghorn Sumac

Last fall I dried some sumac clusters, broke them up in the food processor, then sifted out the hard seeds through a strainer. This makes a sour seasoning that is perfect to add to dishes like fatoush, tabouli and hummus.

Today I made raw tabouli salad (without grains), but you could easily add a cup of cooked quinoa, cracked wheat or cous cous to the salad to turn it into a more traditional tabouli. For fatoush, simply add small pieces of toasted pita into the salad.

Raw Tabouli Salad

  • 1 tomato, chopped
  • 1 cucumber, seeds removed (and saved for smoothies or juices), chopped
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1/2 tsp dried sumac seasoning
  • bunch of parsley leaves, chopped
  • 1 Tbsp dried mint, crumbled and added
  • 1 Tbsp (or more, to taste) onion, chopped very small
  • 1/2 red pepper, chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • drizzle olive oil (about 1 Tbsp)

Middle Eastern Salad

Raw Tabouli Salad

Mix all ingredients and enjoy.

Think happy thoughts….it’s March 1 and spring is sure to be upon us soon. To those of you who have access to maple trees: now is the time to tap them for their wonderful sap. Soon another wild year will be upon us!

Festive foraging,

~ Melissa Sokulski

Stay in touch! Make sure you sign up for our free newsletter (green box in the upper right margin.) Also, visit our sister blog at Birch Center for information on acupuncture, natural wellness and more great healthy recipes.

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Week 16: Chicken Mushroom!

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chicken mushroom, Laetiporus sulfureus

chicken mushroom, Laetiporus sulfureus

This week it finally rained! So we scoured the woods and found enough chicken mushroom for all of us to have a wonderful meal! (This plus another bloom about this size.) Hip hip hooray! It is always so nice to find edible wild mushrooms to share.

Chicken mushroom is considered a safe mushroom, in that there are no poison look alikes…but you need to know what you are looking for! It is a polypore, which means it is a “shelf” mushroom (looks more like a shelf than an umbrella - the “classic” mushroom shape), it grows from wood (often dead wood), and it does NOT have gills on the underside, instead it has tiny pores (hence the name, “polypore”.) Chicken mushroom is bright yellow/orange, and the underside of Laetiporus sulfureus is yellow. There is another variety of chicken mushroom - Laetiporus cinncinatus - whose underside is white. This *IS* another bright yellow mushroom which grows on wood, but it has GILLS on the underside: The Jack O’Lantern. The Jack O’Lantern is poisonous (it makes you sick, though is not usually deadly). So make sure if you’re out in the woods you check the underside: NO GILLS!

Chicken mushrooms must be cooked before eating!!

You have so much this week you can really experiment. I like it sliced and sauteed in butter. I usually add water as well so it doesn’t dry out. After that…it’s up to you! I just eat it, maybe put it on top of a salad or eat as a side dish. you can use the cooked chicken mushroom in place of cooked chicken in chicken salad. Here is what Steve Brill writes about chicken mushroom, including links to a few recipes at the bottom of the page. My Vegan Chicken-Mushroom Fricassee was delicious if you wanted to try that!

Here is what is in your share this week:

  • chicken mushroom
  • cornelian cherries
  • purslane
  • sumac
  • wild grape leaves (we had a request for more of these! They are really fun to work with!)
  • peppermint - thanks to massage therapist extraordinaire and CSF member Claire who donated mint to the share this week!! Thank you Claire!!

Some of our share laid out this week: staghorn sumac, chicken mushroom, wild grape leaves

Some of our share laid out this week: staghorn sumac, chicken mushroom, wild grape leaves

Did you enjoy the cornelian cherries last week? Did you let them get ripe (soft and sweet?) As with last week they should ripen within a day or two. They ripen off the tree, so keep them out of the fridge and they should soften right up. Once ripe go ahead and put them in the fridge (keeps the fruit flies away! I have a cloth over mine as they ripen on the counter.) They can be eaten plain, raw (which is what our family did), or you can make something yummy with them, like a cornelian cherry and apple cobbler! Here’s a great page with info on the cornelian cherry (which is not really a cherry at all, but a member of the dogwood family.) Remember to be careful of the hard pit inside the fruit.

cornelian cherries

cornelian cherries

We had a request for more grape leaves, so more you got! Have you been making stuffed grape leaves? (The tutorial on rolling grape leaves.) Last time I made them I steamed them instead of sauteeing…very good as well!

If you want to do something with the sumac besides sumac lemonade, you can dry it and make a lemony spice from it. Strip the berries off the central stalk and lay them out on a tray. If you have a dehydrator you can use it, or you can air dry it (or put it in the stove on low heat until dry.) Once it’s dry grind it in a blender or coffee grinder and store in glass jars. Za’atar is a middle eastern spice blend used on veggies and meats. The main ingredient is sumac. Here is a recipe for za’atar.

Thanks again Claire for the mint!!!

Enjoy your share this week!!!

Love and chicken mushrooms,

Melissa

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Lucky Number 13 CSF Share

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Lucky Number 13 with garlic flowers

Lucky Number 13 with garlic flowers

With the heat comes hot and spicy and that’s what we have for you with this week’s share: peppergrass and garlic flowers! Hotcha!! Also a green from south and central America that tends to appear when the land is hot and dry: amaranth. A bit more bitter than lambs quarters, but used similarly. You may know amaranth for it’s seeds but today we will enjoy its nutritious green leaves.

We were out there for many hours over many days in many parks hunting for mushrooms but it was so dry that we came up dry. :-( But with the past couple days of rain we are hoping to be luckier next week! We do have a great share for you this week, though, which includes:

  • Wild Garlic Flowers (or maybe they were volunteers, either way they are delicious!) *NEW
  • Amaranth Greens *NEW
  • Peppergrass *NEW
  • Lambs Quarters
  • Purslane
  • Staghorn Sumac
  • Yellow Dock Seed

It has been HOT and DRY in Western PA! Amaranth Greens are a wonderful little plant from Central and South America which offers vibrant greens during desert drought…a time when most spring greens are done and the heat has turned what’s left tough and bitter, that’s when to find Amaranth.

Amaranth Greens

Amaranth Greens

You may recognize Amaranth as a grain (gluten-free grain) which is known for having lots of nutrition and protein. Indeed this is true and hopefully in a few weeks we’ll be able to collect enough seeds to add those to your share. Right now though the green is what you want, bright and green while most other greens are wilted and gone. (Gone are the days of too many nettles, too much chickweed, an overflow of garlic mustard…*sigh*).

Some people call this wild edible “pigweed” (though some refer to Lambs quarters as “pigweed”, so that can be tricky. Use it just as you would use Lambs Quarters, though, which is to say just as you would use spinach, kale, chard, or any green like that.

Garlic Flowers

Garlic Flowers

What a find these garlic flowers were! On my friend’s property in Gibsonia, out back behind her compost heap, there we were, Dave and I, hungrily surveying her field of garlic. “You can have them,” she said from behind us, and we couldn’t have been more pleased! Cutting the garlic flower off at this point actually helps the bulb (root) get bigger, so maybe in a few weeks we’ll go back for those! But for now you can use these garlic flowers (which look a lot like garlic bulbs) in soups or stir-fries. They are very garlicky! Enjoy!

peppergrass

peppergrass

The peppergrass is very spicy, give it a little nibble. I usually eat the seed pods but you can also eat the leaves. You probably just want to use a little of this to season/add zing to a soup or salad. You can also dry it and use it as a dried spice.

Sumac tree in bloom with foliage - not how it looks right now!

Staghorn sumac

The staghorn sumac has been awesome! We’ve been filling a pitcher (or large jar) with water, putting the sumac blossoms in (just as is…we’ll give them a quick rinse and pop them in the water), cover, put the water in the fridge and you’ll have tart delicious water that is full of vitamin C and refreshment (especially on a hot hot day). Make sure not to let these gorgeous red clusters go unused…they really are great. I haven’t been sweetening my drink, but Ella has been putting a dash of maple syrup into hers. You can keep adding water to top it off and in the fridge it will keep for quite a few days.

To make a stronger/faster brew: cover sumac with cold water in a large jar, put the cap on, place in the sun for a couple hours (making “sun tea”), then refrigerate. Enjoy when nice and cold. Yum!

Your share still contains plenty of the succulent, omega-3-rich purslane, which of course is awesome. The stalks are getting somewhat thick and tough on some of these, though, so if you are using for salad you may want to pull the leaves off and compost the stalks. Or maybe they make a great grilled veg, stalks and all - experiment! (and let me know - we have no grill!)

Lambs Quarters is still and will always be delicious. Again, the stalk is getting thick, I have been using the leaves only at this point. I’ve been putting them in smoothies, salads, and chopping them into just about every cooked thing I make. The other day I made this gluten-free zucchini lasagna.  For the filling I crumbled tofu (in place of ricotta), added chopped onions, chopped lambs quarters, dried rosemary, dried thyme, dried basil and salt. See? It goes everywhere!

Gluten-free zucchini lasagne, which has lambs quarters because I like to add it to everything.

Gluten-free zucchini lasagne, which has lambs quarters in it because I like to add LQ to everything.

If you are a bread baker I hope you are adding at least a little yellow dock seed to your bread, just because. (Because you have it and it’s full of protein and nutrients!) I add it to biscuits. I made some zucchini bread and I forgot to add it but when I make it again I will add some so the mish mash of gluten-free flours in the batter: I grind buckwheat, millet, g-f oats, chickpeas, etc. all into flour in place of wheat flour. I do this in my vitamix, but you can also use a coffee grinder. And remember to try the delicious onion and cheese biscuits!

You can also put it into oatmeal. Here’s a great recipe for gluten-free whole grain oatmeal: (amounts vary by how much you want to make/how many people you have eating!)

Overnight: Soak 1/4 cup Quinoa and 1/4 cup Millet (and/or brown rice or forbidden black rice - yum!)

In the morning:

Add rinsed soaked quinoa, millet and rice to 1/2 cup gluten-free rolled oats.

Add any wild seeds such as plantain, yellow dock, amaranth.

Optional: Add sweet fruits and dried fruits like banana, raisins, goji berries. I like to cook these right in. After it’s done cooking I add fresh fruit like grated apple or chopped peaches.

Cover with water plus about 2 inches more water.

Bring to boil, turn to simmer and stir so bottom does not burn. You may add more water as necessary when cooking. I like mine with lots of water cooked a long time (the grains will thicken even if you add lots of water, just be patient and cook it long enough.) It should be done in 20 minutes but I will cook mine longer.

Serve with maple syrup and milk (can use vegan milk like cashew milk.) If I’ve added bananas, raisins and goji berries I usually do NOT add maple syrup because it will taste very sweet to me already.

We got the idea for this recipe after eating a very delicious whole grain oatmeal at The Teahouse in Santa Fe. Here is their recipe…they have since replaced the wheat berries with millet to make it gluten-free. You’ll see that we have adapted the recipe a bit. But I can’t wait to get my hands on some forbidden rice to try it with that! It was so good in Santa Fe.

Enjoy your share, stay cool, and I hope you are doing fun and amazing things with all your fun and amazing new foods!!

Love,

Melissa

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Week 12 Community Supported Foraging

CSF Newsletters, General Posts
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Chicken mushroom/Sulfur Shelf

Chicken mushroom/Sulfur Shelf

What an exciting share we have for you this week!! (Do I say that every week??)

Even though it has been dryer than dry here in Western PA, Dave and his eagle eyes spotted some young fresh chicken mushroom for you! We also have some other amazing things this week:

  • Chicken Mushroom *NEW
  • Sassafras saplings *NEW
  • Staghorn Sumac *NEW
  • Purslane
  • Lambs Quarters
  • Day Lily Buds

Holy Amazing Batman!! (Yes, the new batman movie was filmed in Pittsburgh! Warning - this links to a violent/intense trailer…Batman isn’t the lovable character he once was! But Hines Ward is in this trailer.)

Like most wild mushrooms, The Chicken Mushroom MUST BE COOKED BEFORE EATING!!

In general, you can use it in place of chicken in any recipe. I like to chop it, saute it in butter, and eat it with eggs. Or make “chicken salad” with it, by taking the chopped cooked pieces of the mushroom as I would chopped cooked chicken, and mix with mayonnaise, celery, onion, and mustard.

Here is a recipe for Chicken Mushroom Satay from The 3 Foragers that I am extremely eager to try!

Always remember to use caution when trying any new food, but especially mushrooms (they have complex proteins that may be entirely new for your body to digest). Sample a little (cooked!!) at first and make sure you feel ok. This is always a good rule to follow for any new food.

Wildman Steve Brill also has some great information and recipes for Chicken Mushroom, check him out. Here is his video about chicken mushroom - very informative!

Sassafras sapling

Sassafras sapling

The sassafras sapling makes a delicious tea - just boiled in water. You can boil the whole small sapling: roots, stem, leaves and all.  You can decide whether you want to sweeten it with honey or not.

red berry cluster of staghorn sumac

red berry cluster of staghorn sumac

The last new ingredient, staghorn sumac, also makes an excellent drink. Just soak the entire “blossom” in cold water overnight, and you will have a lemony, vitamin C-rich drink akin to lemonade. Again, you may want to sweeten it or enjoy as is.  Here I take you through how to make this sumac-ade,  step by step. You can also dry the red “berries” and then use them as a lemony spice (used in Middle Eastern cooking.)

The purslane and lambsquarters give you excellent greens to work with again this week. Again we must thank Erin for the amazing purslane! Her urban homestead is for sale!! If you want to have too much purslane to know what to do with - and end up calling me to get some ;-) Check out their incredibly beautiful property, right across the street from Garden Dreams Urban Farm and Nursery.

The lambs quarters stalk is getting thick, so I recommend just using the leaves at this point. They can be eaten raw or cooked - use just like spinach.

And this may be your last week for day lily buds, so enjoy them fully! If you’ve had your fill for now, simply dehydrate the buds and use them later in soups. It’s what they do in Asia and it adds a great flavor!

Sauteed chicken mushroom and day lily buds with onions and garlic over basmati rice

Sauteed chicken mushroom and day lily buds with onions and garlic over basmati rice

This morning I sauteed the chicken mushroom in a little butter, then added onion and garlic and a handful of day lily buds (which only need a quick saute), some gluten-free tamari and mirin and served over a bed of brown basmati rice. Yummmm!

Lots of love,

Melissa

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Food Under Foot Taps Maple Trees!

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We love collecting wild foods in the city. One thing our little house with it’s 20 by 60 foot property does not afford us, though, are maple trees.

Fortunately we have friends with land that live nearby and this year they have invited us to tap their trees to collect maple sap and make syrup! We are so grateful and super excited!

We got up bright and early this morning and collected some sticks from staghorn sumac trees. The hole in the tree will be 1/2 inch diameter, so we tried to find sticks that were just a little bigger. Sumac trees have a soft pith inside which is easy to push out with metal coat hanger. Then we widdled one end down to less than 1/2 inch, this is the side we will hammer into the tree (after drilling a 1/2″ diameter hole about 2-3 inches into the tree, see our next post which tells exactly what we did.)

100_0586

tapered ends

tapered ends

This is how a staghorn sumac looks during the summer, just in case you are wondering which tree I am talking about:

Sumac tree in bloom with foliage - not how it looks right now!

Sumac tree in bloom with foliage - not how it looks right now!

Now there are no leaves, but the old red berry clusters are still on them, which makes them very easy to identify. The staghorn sumac has velvety branches, but you can use any red berried sumac. Poisonous sumac has white berries, so as long as you see trees with clusters of these red berries (which may not be as vibrant red now, but they will still look red) you have the right tree to use. I believe elderberry trees also have a soft pith that can be pushed out, so if you happen to know of an elderberry tree you can use those instead.

We put 11 spiles into 8 trees and have been collecting sap and boiling it down into syrup for 3 days now! We’ve made delicious maple syrup and delectible maple candies. I’ll share more later…with pictures and maybe even a video or two!

Enjoy mud season! It’s also maple syrup season!
~ Melissa Sokulski
Food Under Foot

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Great Walk Today!

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Thanks so much to everyone who joined us on our wild edibles walk today on Pittsburgh’s south side! We couldn’t find the camera before we left for the walk (we have since found it and I put some great photos of the St. John’s Wort - which I knew I saw growing out of the rocks on the way to the walk - on facebook!) However, I will embellish this post with pictures of the plants we saw today that I have taken before. You’ll find the St. John’s Wort at the end…and also check it out on facebook if you’re on there.

Mulberries (Morus)

Mulberries (Morus)

We had a great time collecting mulberries! White ones, purple ones, red ones! I wish I had a picture of the girls sitting on the sheet filling their containers with berries and eating as many (or more!) than they dropped in their cups! Here’s an old picture of Dave and Ella collecting mulberries from a great tree on Polish Hill.

Dave and Ella collecting mulberries 4 years ago on Polish Hill.

Dave and Ella collecting mulberries 4 years ago on Polish Hill.

We also saw:

  • Burdock (Arctium lappa) The root is known as Gobo in Japan. Eat the root raw, cooked or juiced. Can also eat the flower stalks and leaf stalks like celery. (See our Burdock page for picture and full description)
  • Dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis) All parts of this plant are edible: roots, leaves, flower. Flower petals go nicely into batters (like pancake batter or cookie batter.) Roasted root makes a good coffee substitute, along with roasted chicory root and roasted burdock root. (See our Dandelion page for pictures and full description)
  • White Clover (Trifolium repens) A mild but nutritious green, add to smoothies or salads. Can also use red clover (which is often dried and used as tea), we didn’t see red clover today.
  • Thin Leafed Plantain (Plantago lanceolata) - Fairy bandaids! Chew and place on bee stings (and other stings/bites) to take the pain away. Can eat as a green, mild tasting can be blended into smoothies or juices. I recently made a salve which worked wonders on a poison oak rash.
  • Plantago Lanceolate (Thin Leaf Plantain)

    Plantago Lanceolate (Thin Leaf Plantain)

  • Broad Leafed Plantain (Plantago major) Same uses as above. This also has seeds in the fall which can be collected and used in oatmeal, breads, flours, and as a substitute for psyllium seeds, which are also a Plantago.
  • Japanese Knotwood (Polygonum cuspidatum) Eaten in early spring when shoots are tender, but the stalks can probably still be juiced. Lemony. Very good source of Resveratrol (especially the roots) and has been used to treat Lyme Disease.
  • Lambs quarters (Chenopodium alba) High in protein, high in calcium, one of my favorite edibles. “Wild Spinach”, is closely related to quinoa. I use it in smoothies and any place I would use spinach.
  • Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) Garlicky tasting invasive weed, makes a great pesto!
  • Garlic Mustard

    Garlic Mustard

  • Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) Recently the root has been used as a cure for Lyme Disease
  • Mugwort (Artemesia vulgaris) Used in Chinese Medicine, can make moxa from this dried herb. Also used in dream pillows to enhance dreams.
  • mugwort1

  • Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina) When fruit turns red in fall, use dried as a lemon-tasting spice, or steep in cold water for a lemon-water or sweeten for a lemonade-like drink. High in vitamin C.
  • Mulberries (Morus species)
  • Wild Carrot/Queen Anne’s Lace(Daucus carota) Root smells like carrot, and there is a red petal in the middle of a lacy white flower, which distinguishes it from its deadly relatives Poison Hemlock and Water Hemlock. Still, we make it a rule not to eat wild carrots (though edible) to avoid a deadly mistake.

We also saw two poisonous plants and a common allergen:

  • Crown vetch (Securigera varia, or Coronilla varia,) Contains nitroglycerides and is dangerous for horses and other non-ruminants, such as people
  • A wild foxglove Also dangerous to the heart
  • Ragweed - A common allergen

Don’t forget: if you sign up for our newsletter (right, green box) you’ll get FIVE FREE EBOOKS about 5 common wild edibles! They are full of color pictures and great recipes.

And now…here are the pics of St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum):

St. John's Wort growing out of a rock wall on Pittsburgh's South Side

St. John's Wort growing out of a rock wall on Pittsburgh's South Side

The flower buds of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort) stain maroon when squeezed.

The flower buds of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort) stain maroon when squeezed.

Thanks so much to everyone for coming!

Please make sure you sign up for our newsletter so we can let you know when our next walk will be.

~ Melissa Sokulski

Food Under Foot

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Walking With The SCA

General Posts, Identification
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We had a great time going on a wild edibles walk with students of Pittsburgh’s SCA (Student Conservation Association.)
We knew we wouldn’t find any along the south side river trail, so we brought along some beautiful sky-blue chicory, which is in bloom all along the roadsides and all over the city these days.
We sampled herbal tea which had chicory in it, and discussed it’s use as a coffee substitute (drying and roasting the roots.)

(You can read more about chicory in my article in Natural News here.)

We did have some great finds along the south side trail that day, including:

  • Dandelion
    dandelion leaf rosette

    dandelion leaf rosette

  • Burdock
  • Garlic Mustard
  • Purslane - delicious succulent plant, high in omega fatty acids
    Purslane - High in Omega Fatty Acids

    Purslane - High in Omega Fatty Acids

  • Lamb’s Quarters - delicious “wild spinach” (please sign up for our newsletter (top right) for lots more info about lambs quarters!)
  • Japanese Knotweed
  • Mugwort
  • Staghorn Sumac (which we all sampled the sumac lemonade we had made for them, see previous post.)
    Staghorn Sumac - we soaked the red clusters in water for a lemony drink

    Staghorn Sumac - we soaked the red clusters in water for a lemony drink

  • Poisonous Crown Vetch - the variety Penngift was made in Pennsylvania, to plant along the highway to prevent soil erosion…with limited results. The soil continues to erode, and while cows and other ruminant can safely eat the plant, which is high in nitroglyceride, it is poisonous to horses and other non-ruminants. It spreads very easily as well.
  • Wild Carrot - which, though edible, we do not eat because of it’s similar appearance to the very deadly Water Hemlock and Poison Hemlock
    Queen Anne's Lace/Wild Carrot

    Queen Anne's Lace/Wild Carrot

  • Mullein - an herb which benefits the lungs, and often smoked by Native Americans for that purpose
    First Year Mullein basal rosette

    First Year Mullein basal rosette

  • St. John’s Wort - an herb used to treat depression
    St. John's Wort

    St. John's Wort

Here are some pictures of what the kids and adults of the SCA:

walking and talking with folks of the SCA

walking and talking with folks of the SCA

Pittsburgh Student Conservation Association

Pittsburgh Student Conservation Association

Finding Garlic Mustard Under The Trees

Finding Garlic Mustard Under The Trees


Reviewing what we'd identified

Reviewing what we'd identified

If you’d like more information about scheduling a wild edible walk for your group, please visit our wild event page. Or you can call Melissa at (412) 381-0116, or email to Melissa@FoodUnderFoot.com.

Thanks!
~ Melissa Sokulski, Herbalist
Food Under Foot

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Sweet and Tart Staghorn Sumac Lemonade

General Posts, Identification, Recipes
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And from the desert we head back east…

Staghorn Sumac

Staghorn Sumac


Yesterday we gathered staghorn sumac, to make a lemonade-type of drink for the kids from Pittsburgh’s Student Conservation Association (SCA) to sample on their walk today. (I’ll post more pictures and information about all we saw on the walk early next week.)

Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina) grows in bright red clusters on a shrub or small tree (which spreads “like a weed!”) The staghorn sumac has think, densely hairy branches and twigs (giving the appearance of a stag’s horn.) You can pick the fruit clusters in summer, fall, even into winter, as long as they are still vibrant red. They are high in Vitamin C (so we use cold water when making the lemonade, so as not to destroy the vitamin) and have a sour lemony taste. They can also be dried and used as a lemony spice, common in Middle Eastern recipes.

Poison sumac (Toxicodendron vernix) has white fruit, please avoid all white fruited sumacs!

Here is how we made the lemonade. It’s very simple:

Above are the sumac clusters on the table, and below I’ve put them in a jar.

Fill the jar with cold water (cold water preserves the vitamin C) and let it sit overnight. In the morning, strain and add sweetener like honey, agave nectar or maple syrup to taste. You could leave out the sweetener as well, it tastes refreshingly sour, like lemon water.

The walk today was so much fun! The kids (and adults) were great - a wonderful enthusiastic group. I’m excited to share with you all we saw!

~ Melissa Sokulski
Food Under Foot

**If you want more information about scheduling a wild edibles walk for your group, check our wild events page. Or you can call Melissa Sokulski at (412) 381-0116, or email to Melissa@FoodUnderFoot.com. Thanks!**

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